The Greenbrier Wedding Chapel

CELEBRATE YOUR WEDDING AT THE GREENBRIER

Imagine planning for your fairy tale wedding your entire life. You have the most fantastic partner, incredible ring, picked out your fantasy wedding dress, and have found the perfect spot in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia, The Greenbrier.

The Greenbrier is a National Historic Landmark, in the Allegheny Mountains that has been hosting guests since 1778. White columns, unique interior design, and that beautiful southern charm are just a few of the incredible things you and your guests will find at this lavish resort.

WEDDING PACKAGES

You are not alone in preparing for your big day at The Greenbrier. Dedicated Wedding Team members assist in making your fantasy wedding preparations seamless.

There is no shortage of venue options here; bring 40 of your closest friends or 600 family members. Outdoor locations such as North Grove offers a capacity limit of 80, with Kate’s Mountain having a limit of 400.

Indoor possibilities include Colonial Hall, where 600 of your best friends will help you celebrate your big day. For a smaller group, North Parlor and Spring Room and Terrace accommodate 40.

Regardless of the venue, the dinner packages for these elegant wedding packages are phenomenal. The Monaco offers a cocktail hour to include assorted Canapes and an enhancement station, formal reception which consists of a three-course meal and the wedding cake, a couple of moonshines, not the kind you drink, along with a four-hour premium bar package if desired.

The selection for the Canapes is abundant, and they are available hot or cold. There are seven salads to pick from, along with seven types of soup. For the main course, one may choose a farm, sea, or garden option. Some of the farm options include Braised Beef Shortribs, Natural Jus, or Grilled Veal Chop, Morel Mushroom Cream Sauce.

Choose from a House Salumi Display, Sushi Sashimi, or a Garden Roasted Vegetable with Cheese Display as your Cocktail Hour Enhancements.

Reception stations are also available such as a Chilled Seafood Display, House Smoked Breast of Turkey Carving Station, or a Stone-Cold Ground Grits Action Station. There are also several other options available, should you choose to offer your guests a strolling station at the reception.

Bini Grilled Cheese and Tomato Soup and Fired Mac N Cheese with Franks Red Hot Aioli are just two options for your moonshine.

One cannot have a wedding without a delicious dessert bar! With over ten amazing options to choose from, your guests will not be disappointed!

Eight wedding cake flavors are available for the cake of your dreams. Velvet, Vanilla Crisp, and Cappuccino are some of the delicious flavors you must decide from.

Should you opt for a bar at your wedding, The Greenbrier has several to pick from based upon the Wedding Package you have selected.

INTIMATE WEDDING PACKAGE

For those brides and grooms that wish to keep their big day somewhat low key, with less than 20, the intimate wedding package is perfect. Offered exclusively Sunday through Thursday, this package comes with an indoor or outdoor ceremony, ceremonial music, one-hour photography (Greenbrier Photography), the bride’s bouquet, groom’s Boutonniere, a two-tier wedding cake, along with rose petal turndown and sparkling wine.

A wedding reception on The Greenbrier property, along with a stay of two-nights minimum, is required for this package. The room stay is in addition to the package, but do not be discouraged, help is available to help you book.

GOING TO THE CHAPEL WEDDING PACKAGE

Grab five of your closest friends or family members and head to The Greenbrier for a wedding chapel wedding either indoors or outdoors. Do not worry about a Bridal Bouquet or Boutonniere, you will get these, along with rose petal turndown and a sparkling wine bottle.

There is a two-night minimum stay needed, and it is in addition to your package. Also, you will need to have your reception on the property.

ACCOMMODATIONS

From the Presidential Suite, which offers seven bedrooms and accommodations for 14 down to Gable rooms that accommodate two, there is no shortage of places to stay as you prepare for your big day.

There are also six Estate Homes that will have you and your guests feeling like a king or queen. Relax by the fireplace or relax as you view The Greenbrier golf course.

Seven Legacy Cottages offer amenities such as a king bed, wet bar, patio, porch, or a working fireplace.

The possibilities are endless!

Stand up Paddle Boarding at The Greenbrier

5 Reasons You Should Give Stand Up Paddle Boarding a Try

5 Reasons You Should Give Stand Up Paddle Boarding a Try

Stand up paddle boarding, or SUP is a water sport that has taken the water by surprise! Let’s face it; one can participate in this popular explosive event in any type of body of water. Mountain lakes, rivers, canals, and the ocean are just a few excellent places to SUP.

Should you need more convincing, check out our 5 reasons on why you should give stand up paddle boarding a try.

1. Intense Control

River rapids and racing entice those outdoor enthusiasts seeking some tough challenges. While you may see the most skilled gliding along the water like a red slider, stand up paddle boarding is magnificent no matter your skill level. Maintaining balance, constant movement, and having a graceful wide stance will have you cursing along before you know it.

2. Outstanding Views

When you are standing up on a paddle board, there are no obstructions. The views are unobstructed and offer up a 360-degree angle of everything around. Imagine being able to see the minnows swimming near the top of the water as you traverse your way by kayakers who have their views blocked by the edges of the kayak.

3. Exercise

This low-impact exercise option is perfect for the younger ones and anyone who is starting out with a new exercise regimen. Balance and strengthening of the core, mixed with the use of your arm, back, and shoulder muscles, will give you a single workout with some extraordinary views. The more speed you pick up, the better your cardio workout regime for the day. Please remember that a Personal Flotation Device may be required while out on the water.

4. Inexpensive        

For those just starting out or not wishing to purchase their own board quite yet, renting is the way to go. Prices are usually $30 or less for an hour, and under $60 for the day, this is by far cheaper than a boat or jet-ski rental. Plus, everything you will need for an incredible time on the water is included. Yes, this means your board, paddle, and any required safety gear you may need.

5. Relaxation

Soccer games, dance lessons, baseball practice, work, and life, in general, is stressful! Finding downtime to process all the daily stresses thrown at us is important.

While you can get one heck of a rush of adrenaline climbing 30,000 feet and leaping out of a moving airplane, that thrill-seeking adventure is not for everyone. Almost every person loves to relax. What better way to calm your nerves than to slide across a body of water like you are a member of royalty without a care in the world. After all, it is your board, your rules, your choice of water, and your thoughts that help bring a sense of relaxation.

Conclusion

There you have it, 5 reasons to give paddle boarding a try. Should none of these genuinely entice you and you are still on the fence, think of the possibility of graciously gliding next to a celebrity. That is right, how thrilled would you be should you have the honor of paddle boarding past Julia Roberts or The Boss, Bruce Springsteen.

Family taking a guided hike in the Garden of The Gods, Colorado Springs

An exhaustive guide to simpler traveling with small children

Getting ready to come to Colorado Springs. Great, there is a lot to do for you, and your family. Mary Kearl gives us some great tips and hints to bringing your young ones along.

I spent the first half of 2019 traveling with my husband and our one-year-old throughout South America, where we managed to visit some remote places, such as the Galapagos Islands in Ecuador, the Amazon rainforest in Brazil, the floating islands of the Uros people in Peru, and Ushuaia, in Argentina, also known as the end of the world.

When we talk about this, many fellow parents ask how we did it. Most of them say it’s a challenge to take their kid to the mall or the restaurant down the street, let alone travel with them to the other side of the world. The funny thing is that it’s always hard—putting your child’s needs first and keeping them healthy, happy, and entertained will always be difficult no matter how far from home you are.

Having visited 14 countries and 16 U.S. states on a total of 77 trips (and counting) with our child, I’ve learned a thing or two about traveling with babies and toddlers. It’s hard, but it’s possible.

Documentation

It may seem obvious, but no matter how young your child is, they’ll need a passport to leave the country—but it involves more than simply filling out a form. Getting a minor a passport requires demonstrating proof of citizenship, and the primary method is to submit a copy of their birth certificate. This document usually becomes available one month after a child’s birth, but may take longer. In our case, this proved challenging because our child was less than a month old when we first sought out a passport. We tried our local court, but finally obtained the document from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health for $28.

Health preparations

Thinking something might happen to you or your partner while away from home can be scary, but those fears amplify tenfold when you’re traveling with a young child. “Truth be told, most places are pretty safe for kids,” says Dr. Katherine Williamson, vice president of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). “Travel is accommodating for families of all ages.”

But of course, being prepared makes things a lot easier for both the parents and the baby. Just add these items to your checklist before you hit the road:

Consult with your pediatrician

Ahead of your travels, it’s always a good idea to make an appointment with or talk to your pediatrician about any further advice regarding your child.

Medication

If your child is undergoing any kind of medical treatment, make sure you pack enough to last for the entirety of your trip. To be on the safe side, Williamson recommends packing a couple of extra doses and a prescription in case you need to purchase the medication while abroad.

Vaccinations

Make sure your child is up to date on their routine vaccines. Start by protecting them against influenza with the flu shot for kids aged six months and older, and check the Center for Disease Control guidelines about what other vaccines they’ll need for particular countries or specific outbreaks that might be occurring. One of the biggest concerns involving travel outside the U.S. is measles. Routine vaccines starting at age one will protect against this highly contagious disease, but your child can get the measles vaccine as early as six months if you’re traveling, Williamson says.

Plan ahead to ensure proper sleep

The first two to three days are key, and you should try to get ahead of jet lag as much as possible by gradually adjusting your kid’s bedtime. For time changes greater than two or three hours, Williamson recommends you give toddlers between 0.5 to 1 milligram of melatonin while you’re on the plane at what will be bedtime at the destination you’re visiting. This will help them start sleeping at the right time. Conversely, once you get to your destination, help your child adjust to time zone changes by having them be active during waking hours, exposing them to sunlight during the day, and not letting them nap longer than normal.

Talk to people who’ve been there

There’s only so much online research you can do before being overloaded with information. The best way to get a sense of a place is to talk to somebody who’s actually been there and ask whatever questions Google couldn’t answer for you.

Packing

Let's play a game: try spotting the toddler among the suitcases.
. Popular Science

As of this writing, our family of three has been living out of two suitcases, a backpack, and a diaper bag for exactly 10 months. That sounds challenging for two adults alone, but packing requires a whole new level of expertise when an infant or toddler is involved. Fear not—we’ve been learning from our mistakes so you don’t have to. Next time you embark on an adventure with your little one, make sure you always have these items handy:

Enough clothes

When our child was an infant, my packing rule of thumb was to bring about three daytime outfits and two pajamas per day to account for spills, getting sick, and diaper leaks. It’s a lot, but with the transition to toddlerhood, I kept following this rule with great success, only breaking it when I know I’m going somewhere we’ll be able to wash our clothes.

Diapers, wipes, and diaper rash cream

These are a must, whether you’re flying across the world with your toddler or visiting a friend on the other side of town. The key here is to ensure you’ll never have to depend on finding a store, so even though it may sound over-the-top, I pack double the amount of diapers and wipes I think I’ll need. In my experience, no matter how big an airport or transit station is, it’s not likely even the most essential baby products will be readily available.

Plenty of entertainment

This will take up space, so be prepared to carry this stuff in its own bag if necessary. To start with, we pack a lot of board books—10 for trips of any size, since we may read through all of them before our child is ready for nap time. Hopefully, it’ll take fewer with yours, but be prepared to have options, or you’ll be stuck reading the same two or three stories on a loop. Also, include several toys and stuffed animals. Make sure you bring extra, since it’s almost certain you’ll lose some along the way.

A baby carrier

A great alternative to the traditional stroller. We used this for our seven months of international travel, since most places we visited had uneven terrain and were not stroller-friendly.

Car seat

This is important whether you’re driving your own car or not, since there’s no guarantee one will be available or in good condition through your rental car company. Plus, the rental price of a seat can be more than the cost of a new car seat, depending on the length of your trip.

A travel bed and baby blanket

Some parents will try to save themselves some trouble and co-sleep with their babies. But the APP doesn’t recommend this for children younger than a year old, so bringing a travel bed for your baby is absolutely necessary. More on this later.

Other essentials

Nail clippers, baby thermometer (digital or traditional—it’s up to you), travel first aid kit (it’s easiest to buy one and complement it with additional necessities for you and your child), two bottles, and two sippy cups (it’s best to have two of each to replace a lost one or stand in for a dirty one).

The medical packing list

Being sick while traveling is bad, but for babies it's even worse. Make sure to pack everything your child needs if something goes wrong. Here's hoping you'll never use any of it.
. Popular Science

You know when you travel and you feel tired and grumpy, and sometimes that even leads to physical pain or discomfort? Well, young children go through the same, and they usually don’t know how to cope with it. Williamson recommends packing these essentials to avoid or quickly placate any illness:

Acetaminophen (safe for infants and toddlers) or ibuprofen (safe for children at least six months old).

  • Use for general pain and discomfort.
  • These help with almost anything, from flight-related pressure to a fever. If your child is having a hard time, Williamson recommends to giving it to them mixed with a drink or soft food, like pudding or yogurt.

Cetirizine and loratadine (safe for kids aged two and up) or diphenhydramine (safe for six months and up).

  • Use to prevent travel or motion sickness, and to treat minor allergic reactions that only entail skin rashes. If, while traveling, your child develops any allergies that include swelling of the lips, eyelids, or extremities, or starts vomiting or has difficulty breathing, see a doctor immediately.

Hydrocortisone cream and calamine lotion.

  • Use for mosquito bites.
  • For all bug bites, Williamson suggests applying hydrocortisone cream and then a layer of calamine lotion on top.

Ondansetron (consult with your pediatrician), a powdered electrolyte replacement , and potentially antibiotics for if you contract traveler’s diarrhea from consuming contaminated food or water (consult with your pediatrician)

  • Use for motion sickness, nausea, upset stomach, and diarrhea.
  • For some kids, it’s common to get sick in the car or on the plane. If that’s the case with your child, Williamson recommends talking to a pediatrician about getting a prescription for ondansetron, which can also help with gastrointestinal issues, such as an upset stomach. If your toddler is experiencing nausea or diarrhea, rehydration solutions such as an electrolyte replacement can help ensure your child stays hydrated. And if you’re traveling somewhere where traveler’s diarrhea is a concern, you should ask your pediatrician if getting a prescription antibiotic for the condition would be appropriate for your child.

Other medical devices and medications as needed. If your child has known conditions, pack all the things you’ll need to treat them. This includes an inhaler or nebulizer (for children with respiratory issues), an epinephrine injector (for children with severe allergic reactions), and antibiotics (for children prone to ear infections).

Preparing a “shortcut” bag

When you’re packing for a toddler, consider two levels of packing: everything you’ll need for your trip, and the bag of whatever you want to have handy when you’re on the go—no matter how you’re traveling. Our diaper bag is always so stuffed with all the above necessities that I usually throw it in the overhead bin or keep it at our accommodations when we head out to sightsee. What I do instead is pack another bag, such as a lightweight foldable backpack, that serves as an accessible baby emergency kit. Here’s what to pack:

  • A sippy cup and bottle
  • Snacks, such as cereal, crackers, fruit, and nuts (once your child is eating solids)
  • Formula (up to 12 months) or whole milk (1 year and up)
  • Wipes, and one or two diapers
  • One change of clothing for your toddler
  • A couple of favorite toys and books
  • A plastic bag (in case your baby gets motion sickness, or to store a diaper until it can be disposed of)
  • (Optional) A change of clothing for the parents—especially if your kid is prone to motion sickness. We learned this the hard way after our baby got sick on our laps, and all of our clothes were packed away in checked bags under a plane.

Surviving the journey

It'll be exciting and exhausting. And not just for you.
. Popular Science

I remember how terrified I was ahead of our first cross-country flight—I didn’t want to be that family everybody hates because their baby won’t stop crying. Most people with small children will get to know this fear, but they won’t travel enough to figure out just how to deal with a small kid on a plane. With our now-two-year-old having logged 63 flights and counting, I can confirm what you may have already suspected: there’s no science to the perfect trip with a small child. That said, there are some strategies that will help.

Always pick the aisle seat

From diaper changes to crying sessions, you’ll want the easiest possible access to the bathroom and aisle.

Assume every carry-on item will require extra screening by airport security

Even though liquids, such as breast milk and juice, are allowed on planes when you’re traveling with an infant or toddler, the U.S. Transportation Security Administration says it “may need to test liquids for explosives or concealed prohibited items.” We have missed flights due to extra screening, so be sure to factor this in when you calculate the amount of time you’ll need to arrive at the gate in time.

Take advantage of early boarding

Families with small children usually get the privilege of boarding planes first. Use the extra time to arrange your seat so you’ll have easy access to all those go-to travel items listed above, one last diaper change, and bathroom trips for the adults.

Plan for the worst

This means arranging everything as if your baby won’t sleep for a minute of the journey and there will be travel delays. At first, people recommended we take night flights so we’d all be more likely to sleep. This worked well and our little one became the ideal traveler, sleeping for most, if not all, of any given flight. But that has changed, and our child has begun sleeping less consistently on the plane. Now we book daytime flights and plan as if everyone is going to be awake (and will need to be entertained) the entire time.

Don’t be scared

Some people will be annoyed to find themselves sitting next to you and your kid on a plane, but that seems to be the exception to the rule. In my experience, most people understand how much harder travel is with a young one, and go out of their way to help you.

Sleeping

Ahead of our first cross-country trip with our baby, my husband and I opted for a portable bassinet which met our search criteria by having the following features:

  • Sides made of breathable mesh
  • Removable, washable padding
  • Could be folded to fit under the seat of a plane
  • Could fit a baby for up to six months (some are only recommended for the first three to four months, making a $50-$100 purchase quickly obsolete)

The bassinet worked great for the first six months, but after that, and as our child grew, we had to get creative. Co-sleeping with our baby in our beds didn’t work because our presence distracted our otherwise sound sleeper, who woke several times during the night. We also tried creating a makeshift bed out of pillows and blankets, which worked fine until our baby started crawling and began moving out of the nest. After that, we considered a portable travel crib, but because it’s the size of an oversized backpack when folded, it falls into a grey area when it comes to baggage policy, and can sometimes qualify as a suitcase (at a cost) for discount airlines.

Ultimately we landed on the $15.99 Wayfinder TravelTot baby tent, which works just as well as more expensive options, such as the portable crib. But unlike other alternatives, this tent folds down to a thin sleeve that fits in my carry-on backpack. Since it has no padding, we usually request extra bedding and stack one or two thick quilts underneath the bed and layer a baby blanket inside. The bed survived 11 countries, 61 different Airbnbs and hotels, 30 flights, dozens of ferries and buses, and helped us maintain nap and sleep schedules during a 17-hour flight delay in Bariloche, Argentina. After all that wear and tear, we’re now on our second one.

While our baby’s bed has remained consistent, everything else—the sounds, lighting, temperature, and time zones—has been in constant change. The first two weeks of our international journey, we saw our normally easy sleeper taking longer and longer to fall asleep. Now we make an effort to keep the bedtime routine as consistent as possible—every night, no matter where we are in the world, we have a half-hour wind-down period for a bath and reading books. Things improved almost immediately.

Setting realistic expectations

Yeah, this is not it.
. Popular Science

Family trips with our baby have been some of the most rewarding experiences of my life. That said, the travel life is different when one member of the family is sleeping half the day, needs to eat more than three meals a day, and has a variable attention span.

While it is possible to travel with a baby, it is important to ground your expectations, and most likely change the way you’ve been traveling so far. For us, this has meant having a more limited list of things we want to see and do, or even staying longer than recommended in a place to complete it.

We’ve also realized we cannot do everything together as a family, and sometimes it’s a good idea to part ways. In the Ica Desert in Peru, my husband went on a dune buggy ride while baby and I went swimming in the Huacachina oasis, and in the Amazon, I went on a night crocodile tour while my husband and baby slept. It is a great way to ensure everyone gets to do what they want to do.

Needless to say, we don’t see much nightlife due to the child’s bedtime, and it’s always a good idea to opt for free or lower-cost activities, museums, and live performances rather than investing money in ones we may not be able to fully enjoy.

As a lifelong traveler, I wanted to share my love of travel with my child—and it’s paid off.

Written by Mary Kearl for Popular Science and legally licensed through the Matcha publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@getmatcha.com.